Subscribe to Melton's mailing list

Publications

2009
Singer Y. Exhibiting the Holocaust: A Comparative Analysis of the Permanent Exhibits in Yad Vashem & the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The Melton Centre for Jewish Education. 2009.
Ofer Y. Experiences of Judaism: Formative Jewish experiences and processes among pre-service teachers in the field of Jewish studies. The Melton Centre for Jewish Education. 2009.
Warshawsky K. Returning To The Own Borders: A Social Anthropological Study of Contemporary Messianic Jewish Identity in Israel. The Melton Centre for Jewish Education. 2009.
Walfish R. Teaching Biblical Miracle Stories in Israeli State Religious Schools. The Melton Centre for Jewish Education. 2009.
Nuriel-Katz K. The approach to teaching the Bible: A Case Study of student-teachers in the Training Program for outstandingstudents. The Melton Centre for Jewish Education. 2009.
Tsirolnik I. The Masorti Jew - Major components identity and their transmission to the future generation. The Melton Centre for Jewish Education. 2009.
Kol Hamercaz
Kol Hamercaz. 2009;(December 2009).PDF icon Kol Hamercaz Dec2009.pdf
Jewish Day Schools, Jewish Communities: A Reconsideration
Pomson A, Deitcher H ed. Jewish Day Schools, Jewish Communities: A Reconsideration. (Pomson A, Deitcher H). Littman Library Of Jewish Civilization; 2009. Buy itAbstract

About 350,000 Jewish children are currently enrolled in Jewish day schools, in every continent other than Antarctica. This is the first book-length consideration of life in such schools and of their relationship both to the Jewish community and to society as a whole. It provides a rich sense of how community is constructed within Jewish schools, and of how they contribute to or complicate the construction of community in the wider society...

Peace Education in Conflict and Post-Conflict Societies: Comparative Perspectives
McGlynn C, Bekerman Z, Zembylas M, Gallagher T ed. Peace Education in Conflict and Post-Conflict Societies: Comparative Perspectives. (McGlynn C, Bekerman Z, Zembylas M, Gallagher T). Palgrave Macmillan; 2009. Buy itAbstract

While the number and range of international peace programmes continues to proliferate, there is a marked absence of interdisciplinary and comparative research to guide academic development and inform practice in this challenging arena. It is these deficits that the present volume aims to address. This collection of peace education efforts in conflict and post-conflict societies brings together an international group of scholars to offer the very latest theoretical and pedagogical developments for long term solutions.

The Stabilization of Rabbinic Culture, 100 C.E. -350 C.E.: Texts on Education and Their Late Antique Context
Hirshman M. The Stabilization of Rabbinic Culture, 100 C.E. -350 C.E.: Texts on Education and Their Late Antique Context. Oxford University Press; 2009. Buy itAbstract

Drawing on the great progress in Talmudic scholarship over the last century, The Stabilization of Rabbinic Culture is both an introduction to a close reading of rabbinic literature and a demonstration of the development of rabbinic thought on education in the first centuries of the Common Era. In Roman Palestine and Sasanid Persia, a small group of approximately two thousand Jewish scholars and rabbis sustained a thriving national and educational culture. They procured loyalty to the national language and oversaw the retention of a national identity. This accomplishment was unique in the Roman Near East, and few physical artifacts remain. The scope of oral teaching, however, was vast and was committed to writing only in the high Middle Ages. The content of this oral tradition remains the staple of Jewish learning through modern times. Though oral learning was common in many ancient cultures, the Jewish approach has a different theoretical basis and different aims. Marc Hirshman explores the evolution and institutionalization of Jewish culture in both Babylonian and Palestinian sources. At its core, he argues, the Jewish cultural thrust in the first centuries of the Common Era was a sustained effort to preserve the language of its culture in its most pristine form. Hirshman traces and outlines the ideals and practices of rabbinic learning as presented in the relatively few extensive discussions of the subject in late antique rabbinic sources. The Stabilization of Rabbinic Culture is a pioneering attempt to characterize the unique approach to learning developed by the rabbinic leadership in late antiquity.