Melton Blended Masters in Jewish Education

With the changing reality of Jewish life in the Diaspora, the Melton Centre for Jewish Education is moving in new directions to adapt to these changes and to offer solutions to strengthen Jewish education in communities abroad. 

Using the M.A. track offered at the Melton Centre as a strong base, we have developed a blended On-Site and Distance MA Program (non-research intended for students’ resident overseas) in Jewish Education, which is offered to Jewish educators in Jewish communities around the world.  The program is designed for educators in both formal and informal frameworks who are interested in Jewish Education and its dialogue with the Social Sciences, Educational Philosophy, and Jewish and Israel Studies.  Studies integrate on site and distance learning elements and require 40 credits for graduation.  

The principal advantage of this program is that Jewish educators abroad who, for various reasons are not able to spend a long period in Jerusalem, will have the opportunity to study with Melton Centre faculty and enjoy the unique academic resources of the Hebrew University. In addition, an MA degree in Jewish Education from the Hebrew University has a competitive edge over courses offered by other institutes in terms of the academic level and prestige.

 

The Program

Courses in the Jewish Education MA program are intended to familiarize students with research in Jewish education and to enable the clarification of the goals, methods, practices and challenges involved in transmitting Jewish culture and teaching Jewish and Israel subjects in the Diaspora.

The study program focuses on the following general areas:

  • Social Sciences, Jewish Identity, and Informal Education
  • Philosophy of Jewish Education
  • Contemporary Jewry and Jewish Education
  • Study Programs with Jewish Content
  • Educational Leadership and Innovation

 

Program Structure

The program consists of 40 credits of which 14 credits will be offered on site at the Hebrew University and 26 credits will be offered as distance courses.

Participants must submit two seminar papers. One seminar paper must be related to a course taught on site at the university.

The program may approve up to 4 credits taken outside the Jewish Education track either from among other Hebrew University distance courses or from universities recognized for credit by the Hebrew University. Prior approval must be obtained for courses outside the Jewish Education track.

 

Program Focuses

The Program has three main focuses: the first one is the Philosophy, the Sociology and the Psychology of Jewish Education and Israel Education.

This focus deals with the great issues in Jewish Education and Israel Education: Who is the educated person and who, the educated Jew? Which are the goals of Jewish Education and how can we adapt them to the issues we face today? What is the role of the Jewish educator, and how can the institution help him? What is the place of Israel in Jewish Education? How must the relations between Jewish School and Israel be?  What is the role of the Zionism in our times?

The second focus is on the teaching of Jewish texts. This focus deals with the teaching of Biblical and Talmudic texts. In the program, a few lecturers will give examples of different texts, how to analyze them in order to give the participant the necessary tools to deal with them and teach them in schools and communities. In the courses, participants will learn about different perspectives, like Philosophy of the Child, Levinas’ ethical perspective, and others. This focus is theoretical and practical, because studies involve both the fundamentals of all perspectives, and practical examples that could be implemented in the field.

The third focus is on leadership and innovation in Jewish Education. In this focus, participants will analyze their own personal vision of Jewish Education as well as their institutional vision. In the program, they will study several theories that will help them to reflect on their own Jewish educational vision. Vision, innovation and Leadership are the three main components of this focus. 


Characteristics

• 1-Year Masters Study Program
• 2 Semesters Taught Online via Distance Learning
• 6-Week Intense Summer Semester
• Affordable Tuition
• Taught in English
• Degree granted by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

 

What Do You Need?
Requirements For Acceptance Are As Follows:
1. A GPA of 3.0 or the equivalent of 80 in an undergraduate degree in Education
or in a relevant Behavioral Science or Liberal Arts major. Candidates with
insufficient background in Jewish Studies and/or Education may be required to
take additional prerequisite courses.
2. Current or past involvement and experience in formal or informal Jewish
education.
3. A letter of recommendation from an educator or educational institution.
4. English Proficiency: Non Native English Speakers require proof of English proficiency. This can be one of the following:

  • English Language exemption certificate from academic institution which teaches in English.
  • TOEFL certificate (90 points or higher)
  • IELTS certificate (7 points or higher).

 

 

Tuition & Fees:
1. Registration and Processing Fee: $250
2. Tuition: $16,250 (a first installment of $3,250 is payable upon acceptance)
3. Limited scholarships are available for students with high academic achievement.
4. Included in Fees: All Classes, All Study Materials
5. Separate Add-Ons:
Flights, Accommodations in Israel and Health Insurance.
Also Available: Full Israel Orientation & Acclimatization Package.
Possibility of financial aid for students with low resources.

Policy and Procedures

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Core required courses

Teacher

Credits

Mode

Social Sciences and Jewish Identity

Prof. Gabriel Horenczyk

2

Frontal

Contemporary Jewry and Jewish Education

Dr. David Mendelson

2

Online

Issues in Philosophy and Jewish Education

Prof. Yonatan Cohen

2

Frontal

Curriculum and the Teaching of Jewish Texts

Dr. Howard Deitcher

 

4

Online

Leadership and Innovation in Jewish Education

Dr. Jonathan Mirvis

 

4

Online

Total Core required courses

14

 

General non-core courses

Informal and Experiential Education

Dr. Marcelo Dorfsman / Jonny Ariel.

2

Frontal

Israel Education and the challenge of Zionism in the 21st century

Dr. Alick Isaacs.

 

4

Online

Ethics and Jewish Education in the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas

Dr. Michael Gillis.

 

4

Online

Renewing the practice of Israel Education

Dr. Alex Pomson

 

4

Online

Midrash and Talmud: Texts on Education

Prof. Marc Hirschman

 

2

Frontal

The Philosophical World of the Child and its Implications for Jewish Education

Dr. Jen Glaser

 

2

Frontal

Visions in Jewish Education

 

Dr. Ari Ackerman

4

Online

The Place of Israel in Contemporary Jewish Culture and Education

Dr. Marc Silverman / Haim Aronovich

4

Frontal

Total General non-core courses

26

 

Total Program

40

 

 

Academic Calendar 2016-2017

First Semester

Classes start March 7th 2016 at the Virtual Platform of the Melton Centre.

Classes end June 12th, 2016.

On-Campus 6-week Semester

Classes start July 4th, 2016 at the Melton Centre in Jerusalem on the Mount Scopus Campus.

Classes end August 12th, 2016.

The 6-week semester is composed of 3 full-class days, from 9am to 3pm (or 4pm) and 1 day practical tour on related topic. You must attend all 4 days of activities. The remaining 3 days are for homework assignment, rest and Shabbat.

Second Semester

Classes start in the middle of October 2016 at the Virtual Platform of the Melton Centre.

Classes finished at the end of January 2017.

 

 

 

 

Core required courses

Core required courses


1. Social Sciences and Jewish Identity

Short description

The course will familiarize students with approaches and issues from the social sciences that are relevant to Jewish education in Israel and throughout the world. It will focus primarily on aspects of cultural identity, from the perspectives of sociology and psychology (developmental and social). The course will also examine issues related to motivation for Jewish behavior and aspects of religiosity and spirituality within the context of Jewish education

Credits: 2

Mode: Frontal

Prof. Gabriel Horenczyk

 

2. Contemporary Jewry and Jewish Education

Short description

The course will survey the historical, social and political setting within which Jewish education is conducted in the contemporary Jewish world. It will examine the different ways in which Jewish communities are organized and the impact of the structure of the surrounding societies on Jewish life and education. The course will relate to how demographic trends influence the prospects of Jewish educational institutions. The course will also look at the impact of diverse Jewish ideologies and their educational expression.

Credits: 2

Mode: Online (2nd. Semester)

Dr. David Mendelson

 


3. Issues in Philosophy and Jewish Education

Short description

The course will examine some of the central philosophical issues to be considered in the context of the practice of Jewish education. These include consideration of what can be learned from the classical sources of education such as the Bible and Talmud. What relationship between teacher and student is presumed in these sources? Is education a matter of training or of intellectual development? What place is given to individual creativity in the process of initiation into the tradition? Similar questions are asked in the light of Medieval Jewish philosophy. An attempt will be made to uncover the educational philosophy implied by more modern movements in Jewish education, including Hassidism and the Musar movement.

Credits: 2

Mode: Frontal

Prof. Yonatan Cohen

 

4. Curriculum and the Teaching of Jewish Texts

Short description

In many forms of Jewish education the study of classical Jewish texts, the Bible, Rabbinic literature and central texts of Jewish thought are central to the curriculum. The course will examine the theoretical and practical questions that arise in the attempt to make these texts accessible to teachers and, through them, to students. The course will include a study of curriculum theory, approaches to evaluating curriculum and a review of sample curricula. The course will also examine the ways in which Jewish scholarship can be made a resource for curriculum and the teaching of texts.

Credits: 4

Mode: Online (1st Semester)

Dr. Howard Deitcher

 

5. Leadership and Innovation in Jewish Education

Short description

It is our premise that Jewish Education operates in a competitive field. We compete for the attention of potential students, for valuable resources and funding. These issues lie at the heart of social entrepreneurship.

This course focuses on the growing field of social entrepreneurship and its application to Jewish Education. Students will be introduced to primary concepts, paradigms and literature in the field enabling them to grapple with the aforementioned challenges.

Credits: 4

Mode: Online (2nd  Semester)

Dr. Jonathan Mirvis

 

Total credits for core courses: 14

General non-core courses

General non-core courses

 

1. Informal and Experiential Education

Short description

The workshop will focus on theoretical approaches that substantiate experiential/informal educational methods. Through a combination of readings, assignments and practical exercises, participants in the course will acquire skills in various informal pedagogical practices and strategies. Within the context of the course, students will develop a personal project of their choice.

Credits: 2

Mode: Frontal

Dr. Marcelo Dorfsman / Jonny Ariel.

 

2. Israel Education and the challenge of Zionism in the 21st century

Short description

The workshop will focus on theoretical approaches that discuss the potential relevance of Israel studies in the context of Jewish education. Through a combination of readings, assignments, and practical exercises, participants in the course will acquire skills in a variety of pedagogical practices and strategies. Within the context of the course, students will develop a personal project of their choice.

Credits: 4

Mode: Online (1st  Semester)

Dr. Alick Isaacs.

 

3. Ethics and Jewish Education in the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas  

Short description

The course will study a series of Emmanuel Levinas’ Talmudic readings with an eye to their pedagogic method and their educational significance. The course will investigate how the Talmudic readings fit into Levinas’ broader educational vision and his general philosophy of “ethics as first philosophy.”

Credits: 4

Mode: Online (2nd  Semester)

Dr. Michael Gillis.

 

4. Renewing the practice of Israel Education

Short description

This course is grounded in two assumptions: first, that Israel education is a multidimensional activity concerned with the development of knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, and, second, that Israel is not only a unique subject to be learned and understood, but an integral dimension of all aspects of the educational settings in which it takes place. The course examines and builds on these assumptions to explore how Israel education might become an integral and coherent component of Diaspora Jewish educational institutions.

Credits: 4

Mode: Online (2nd  Semester)

Dr. Alex Pomson

 

5. Midrash and Talmud: Texts on Education

Short description

This course will examine texts from the Babylonian Talmud and the Book of Deuteronomy that reflect attitudes towards education, comparing them to Greco-Roman and Christian treatises from the same period. The course will focus on both the unique and shared aspects of Rabbinic thought about education.

Credits: 2

Mode: Frontal

Prof. Marc Hirschman


6. The Philosophical World of the Child and its Implications for Jewish Education

Short description

This course will examine the philosophy for children approach (P4C) and through this lens reflect on its implications for education in general and Jewish education in particular. Among the topics to be addressed: the role of conceptual ideas in children's lives, the meeting points between culture, language and identity; the role of the child in Western society; the child's encounter with religion and spirituality.

Credits: 2

Mode: Frontal

Dr. Jen Glaser

 

7. Visions in Jewish Education

Short description

This course is an exploration of the questions: "What does it mean for an educator to have a vision of Jewish education? Why is vision important in education?  How does one develop such a vision? In what Jewish and general sources can such a vision be rooted?" The course is aimed at eliciting students' personal responses to philosophical readings that address these questions.

Credits: 4

Mode: Online (1st  Semester)

Dr.  Ari Ackerman


8. The Place of Israel in Contemporary Jewish Culture and Education

Summary

The overarching intention of this course is twofold: i. To identify and understand Jews' worldwide – inside and outside of Israel – current approaches to the meaning of the State of Israel as a Jewish Democratic Nation State to themselves, Jewish life and culture, and to the Nations of the World; ii. To engage in normative discussions regarding the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches based on evaluative criteria that the students and teachers will develop together during the course.

Credits: 4

Mode: Frontal

Dr. Marc Silverman / Haim Aronovich

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

M.A. in Jewish Education – Distance Learning

 

1.  About the program

What degree does the program grant?

An M.A. in Jewish Education from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

 

Can you study the whole program from abroad?

The program comprises two regular semesters and an intensive summer semester.  The regular semesters are held through distance learning from abroad and the summer semester (6 weeks) takes place in Israel during the months of July and August.

 

The program is designed for one year of study

What is the study format of the program?

The method of study for this degree is based on self-study and on group work within a supportive framework of fellow learners. Studies take place on a Hebrew University website designated for distance learning.  Each week the lessons are uploaded to the website and students are required to view the lessons, read the relevant bibliography, participate in discussions and submit assignments.

What is the structure of the study program?

The program takes place over three semesters:

1st Semester:                Three courses, 12 credits (on-line).

Summer Semester:      Six courses, 14 credits (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

2nd Semester:             Four courses, 14 credits (online)

 

What is the language of instruction?

All the courses are taught in English.

 

Is it mandatory to study all the courses in one year?

The program is designed for one year, therefore it is advisable to complete all studies within the year.  If you are not able to do so, you can complete the courses the next year, subject to program regulations.

 

 

2. Course of Study

How much time do I need to invest in an online course?

According to the ECTS – European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System – online courses (4 credits) require 120 student study hours per semester. 

We calculate on average 4-6 study hours per week for each course. This includes reading, assignments, participation, etc., over a period of 14 weeks.

Final paper preparation: 40-50 hours for each course.

 

What is the structure of the 2016-2017 academic year?

  • 1st Semester:                commences 7 March 2016 (14 weeks)
  • Summer Semester:      month of July to mid-August (6 weeks) in Jerusalem
  • 2nd Semester:               commences October 2017 (about 14 weeks)

 

How are we examined abroad?

The online courses have an evaluation system that includes an active presence, participation, class assignments and a final paper. Throughout the courses, progress meetings will be held with program staff and during the summer semester review meetings will be held with the lecturers.

 

3. Candidacy Application and Admission to the Program

In order to register do I need to meet all the prerequisites for acceptance?

Yes.  Registration for an M.A. is conditional upon candidacy submission and meeting all the admission requirements.

 

What are the prerequisites for admission to a graduate program?

An undergraduate degree in Education or parallel in the Social Sciences or Humanities, from an institution recognized by the Hebrew University.

Proven experience as an educator in a formal or informal institute of Jewish Education.

Letter of recommendation

Students whose mother tongue is not English are required to submit proof of a high level of English.  Click here for details.

 

Can we consult with someone before registration?                    

Definitely.

You can contact:

Marcelo I. Dorfsman Ph.D.

The Melton Centre for Jewish Education

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem, ISRAEL 91905

Phone: +972-2-5882026 

Mobile: +972-546711844

Fax: +972-2-532-2211

e-mail: marcelo.dorfsman@mail.huji.ac.il

 

Lirom Global Education

Tel: +972-9-766-6222 | from North America: 718-838-3533

Mobile: +972-54-483 5788

 

What is the date of registration?

Towards the start of the coming academic year, registration opens on the 4.5.2015 and closes on the 31.12.2015.

 

Does candidacy application entail payment?

Yes.  Submitting an application does entail payment.  You can apply to graduate studies throughout the year.  When applying, you must ensure that you meet all the prerequisites for acceptance to the program.

To apply, please click here.

 

I have submitted my application, now what?

You must wait for an answer from the Admissions Committee.  The committee will discuss each request, and if necessary, will invite the candidate for an interview (face-to-face or online) or will request supplementary information.  The Admissions Committee may reach one of the following decisions:

  1. Accept the candidate as a graduate student.
  2. Accept the candidate as a graduate student with a request for supplementary studies.
  3. Reject the candidate.

 

I was accepted, now what?

Now you can register for the program as described in registration.

The acceptance decision is valid for two years from date of notification of acceptance.  Students who do not register for graduate studies within this period of time will have to resubmit their candidacy.

 

4. Recognition of previous studies and supplementary studies for the degree

I studied graduate courses in another institute.  Are they recognized by the Hebrew University?

The Academic Committee of the Melton Centre will consider whether to recognize relevant courses studied in another institute.  The maximum amount to be recognized and the factors taken into consideration to grant such recognition – differ from program to program.

 

When can I apply for recognition of previous studies?

Upon submission of candidacy or after acceptance to the graduate program.

 

Supplementary studies

If your first degree is not in Education and/or Jewish Studies, you will be required to take supplementary courses.

 

Who do I contact?

Dr. Marcelo I. Dorfsman

 

Academic Calendar 2016-2017

First Semester

Classes start March 7th 2016 at the Virtual Platform of the Melton Centre.

Classes end June 12th, 2016.

On-Campus 6-week Semester

Classes start July 4th, 2016 at the Melton Centre in Jerusalem on the Mount Scopus Campus.

Classes end August 12th, 2016.

The 6-week semester is composed of 3 full-class days, from 9am to 3pm (or 4pm) and 1 day practical tour on related topic. You must attend all 4 days of activities. The remaining 3 days are for homework assignment, rest and Shabbat.

Second Semester

Classes start in the middle of October 2016 at the Virtual Platform of the Melton Centre.

Classes finished at the end of January 2017.

MA Online - Policy and Procedures

 

Blended Masters in Jewish Education - University Teaching and Learning Policy and Procedures –

This document includes teaching policy and procedures relevant to a long-distance study program, and are compatible with the procedures of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.  Click here for the full document of Teaching Policy and Procedures.

 

Introduction 

The Teaching Policy and Learning Procedures have been designed to clarify most academic-administrative procedures common to all students studying in the online MA program in Jewish Education.

These procedures were determined by the Teaching Committee of the Melton Center and conform to the procedures prescribed by the Hebrew University Teaching and Learning Policy and Procedures Committee.  Issues not addressed or exceptional cases, whether they are matters of principle or relate to a group of students or an individual student, will be considered by the Teaching Committee of the Melton Center, and if necessary, will be referred to the Chair of the Committee for Teaching and Learning Policy and Procedures (Va’adat Nahal) for a decision.  The Chair also serves as the tribunal for appeals against decisions made by the Center in areas under the jurisdiction of the University’s Teaching and Learning Policy and Procedures Committee.

1. Terms of Acceptance to the Program

A student who applies to the study program, must submit:

  • Official academic records and BA certificate from an institution recognized by the Hebrew University, with a grade point average of at least 80 or its equivalent
  • Grade records and a certificate of completion of studies
  • CV
  • Registration form
  • If English is not the student’s mother tongue, proof of exemption from English as a Foreign Language from a recognized institution.

For additional information on English as a Foreign Language, please see page 19 of General Procedures.

 

2. Supplementary Studies

Upon acceptance to the program, each student is advised of the required supplementary studies. Students who are not graduates of the School of Education or of a department of Jewish Studies will be required to take supplementary courses in order to ensure their successful and fruitful integration into the MA program. Supplementary courses must be completed by the beginning of the second semester of the program.

Supplementary course grades will not count towards the grade point average of the degree.

For additional information on Supplementary Studies, please refer to page 9 in the General Procedures.

 

3 Courses

3.1.1 The courses are detailed at the Melton Centre’s website.  Notification of changes will appear on the website and on the noticeboards in the Centre.

3.1.2 The lecturer will publicize the course program on the Centre’s website, including a description and its aims.  In addition, the lecturer will inform the students in writing, no later than the first week, of the course requirements and the components of the final grade point average. 

3.1.3 The language of instruction is English.

3.1.4 There are two types of courses:

a. Online courses:  held on the Moodle site of the Centre for Jewish Education during the first and second semester of the program.

b. Frontal courses: held at the Centre for Jewish Education, during the summer semester of the program.

 

3.2 Course Attendance Requirements

3.2.1 Attendance in classes, exercises, seminars etc. is compulsory.  Irregular participation in these courses could deny the student’s right to receive a final course grade.

3.2.2 Participation in online courses entails weekly submission of assignments and/or active participation in discussion groups, as required by the lecturer and the course requirements.

 

3.3 Course Load

3.3.1   All courses offered in the study program are compulsory.

3.3.2   A student is entitled to take exams in all the courses that are part of their course-work schedule and the grades will be listed on their record of studies.

3.3.3 The final grade point average will be determined by all the required courses for the degree as well as two seminar papers that the student will choose, one based on an online course and one based on a summer semester course.

For further information on course procedures, please refer to page 21 in General Procedures.

 

3.4 Academic Credit

3.4.1 Credit reflects the number of course hours, as published in the course program.  .

3.4.2 To fulfil all the requirements for the degree the student must complete 40 credits, including two seminar papers.

A detailed list of credits per course appears in the course program.  Below please find the 2016-2017 study program.

 

3.5  Seminar Paper

  • Definition:  A seminar paper is an extensive paper, theoretical and in-depth, that discusses a specific issue from a course the student studied during his/her degree.
  • Selecting the topic:  Students must submit a seminar paper in two courses: one online course and one summer semester course.  Students must inform the lecturer, during the course (and not after it has ended), of their intention to write a seminar paper within the framework of the course, in order to receive specific instructions on how to carry this out.
  • General style of a seminar paper:  20-25 pages (size 12 font, double-spaced), 10 to 15 bibliographic items (APA citation).  Students must consult with the lecturer with regard to the specific structure of the paper
  • Submitting a seminar paper:  Papers must be submitted no later than three months after the conclusion of the course.  Students must arrange consultation sessions with their lecturer in preparation for submitting the final paper.
  • Course requirements:  A student who submits a seminar paper in a course is exempt from having to write a final paper for this course.  The lecturer will base the student’s final grade on his/her work throughout the course.

 

1st. Semester

Teacher

Credits

Mode

Curriculum and the Teaching of Jewish Texts

Dr. Howard Deitcher

4

Online

Israel Education and the challenge of Zionism in the 21st century

Dr. Alick Isaacs.

4

Online

Visions in Jewish Education

Dr. Ari Ackerman

4

Online

Total 1st Semester

 

12

 

Summer Semester

Social Sciences and Jewish Identity

Prof. Gabriel Horenczyk

2

Frontal

The Place of Israel in Contemporary Jewish Culture and Education

Dr. Marc Silverman / Haim Aronovitz

4

Frontal

Issues in Philosophy and Jewish Education

Prof. Yonatan Cohen

2

Frontal

Informal and Experiential Education

Dr. Marcelo Dorfsman / Jonny Ariel.

2

Frontal

Midrash and Talmud: Texts on Education

Prof. Marc Hirshman

 

2

Frontal


The Philosophical World of the Child and its Implications for Jewish Education

Dr. Jen Glaser

 

2

Frontal

Total Summer Semester

 

14

 

2nd. Semester

Ethics and Jewish Education in the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas

Dr. Michael Gillis

 

4

Online

Renewing the practice of Israel Education

Dr. Alex Pomson

 

4

Online

Contemporary Jewry and Jewish Education

Dr. David Mendelson

2

Online

Leadership and Innovation in Jewish Education

Dr. Jonathan Mirvis

4

Online

Total 2nd Semester

 

14

 

Total Program

40

 

4.      Written Assignments

The procedures in this section relate to written assignments, such as: mid-course assignments (exercises, reports); take-home tests; final course papers, seminar papers etc.

4.1 Submission Dates

4.1.1 Submission date – 1st Semester

  • No later than two weeks from the end of the semester

4.1.2   Submission date – Summer Semester

  • Until the end of September

4.1.3   Submission date – 2nd Semester

  • No later than two weeks from the end of the semester

 

For additional information, please refer to page 34 in the General Procedures.                  

 

5.  Termination of Studies

5.1.1 Students or candidates who terminate their studies during the academic year (even if they have not submitted a course-work schedule) must notify the Melton Centre Student Secretariat by fax or a registered letter.

5.1.2 A student who has paid a deposit but did not commence studying, is entitled to a full refund excluding a $250 administrative fee for registration.

 

5.1.3 A student who notifies of his/her termination of studies within three weeks of the start of the program is eligible to receive a full refund on tuition fees except for the $500 advance payment.

5.1.4 A student who commenced studying and leaves three weeks from the start of the course, and took supplementary courses, will receive a monetary refund excluding the $3250 deposit.

5.1.5 A student who was required to study individual courses or a full semester will be charged according to an amount equal to $400 per a credit.

For general information on this, please refer to page 41 in the General Procedures.

 

6. Degree Eligibility

6.1.2 The final grade for an MA degree will be determined based on the following components:

  • Course grade average – 70%
  • 1st seminar paper – 15%
  • 2nd seminar paper – 15%

Additional information on degree eligibility can be found on page 44 of the General Procedures

 

All issues not included in this document, will be treated in accordance with the General Teaching Policy and Procedures of the Hebrew University.